Is anyone who drives my car covered?

FAQ_button Answer: In most cases, yes, as long as they have the permission or reasonable belief from the insured that they can use the vehicle. The insured is the person named on the insurance policy and their spouse if applicable.

There are some exclusions, so you would need to look at your particular insurance policy to make sure. Remember, everyone in your household must be listed on your insurance policy if they have a license. For example, if a girlfriend you live with uses your car, she may not be covered if you did not list her on your insurance policy. On the other hand, if you live separately, she could use your car with your permission and be covered.

What Happens if I Choose Not to Purchase Car Insurance and Still Drive My Car?

FAQ_button Answer: That depends on the state you live in. Most states have stringent laws about having car insurance and if you don't choose to follow these laws by not purchasing car insurance, there can be tough penalties and fines. You can probably for sure count on loosing your drivers license and getting your car impounded but then you will be charged with breaking the law and that will be on your police record. Also, if you cause an accident, on top of the above mentioned things you will still have to pay for the damage to the other vehicle and people who may have been hurt, which can easily run into thousands of dollars.

What are Car Financial Responsibility Laws?

FAQ_button Answer: This is the law that says you have to prove that you are financially able to pay for anything you may be responsible for while driving your car. The easiest way of showing this is by having car insurance and that is what the majority of people do to comply with this law. Some states to have other ways that one can show financial responsibility such as giving a large cash deposit for the DMV.

My car was totaled and my policy did not pay what I think my car was worth. Why?

FAQ_button Answer: Most auto insurance policies pay the actual cash value (ACV) of a vehicle totaled in an accident. The ACV is equal to the market value of an auto immediately before the accident.

Insurers must use a fair and reasonable method to determine the value of your car. If you have concerns about their decision you may be able to negotiate with your insurer by telling them why your car may have had more value that what the insurance company originally determined.

My car was totaled and my policy did not pay what I think my car was worth. Why?

FAQ_button Answer: Most auto insurance policies pay the actual cash value (ACV) of a vehicle totaled in an accident. The ACV is equal to the market value of an auto immediately before the accident.

Insurers must use a fair and reasonable method to determine the value of your car. If you have concerns about their decision you may be able to negotiate with your insurer by telling them why your car may have had more value that what the insurance company originally determined.